Tag Archives: Mo Ghotbi

The End of the Mission to Guatemala

Susan Dean, RN, is a nurse manager at Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Medical Center.  She’s currently in Antigua, Guatemala, as part of a medical team with Faith In Practice, a nonprofit organization that provides continuity of medical care to the poorest of Guatemala. This is Susan’s seventh consecutive year serving on a Faith In Practice surgical mission.

The surgeries have been completed.  Seventy-nine patients have been served.  Many lives have changed – especially ours.

We saw 9-year-old Luis on our last day. He’s looking forward to going back home to his village, but his journey is not finished. His nose has been reconstructed, but he still needs more oral surgery at a later date. His speech has not been helped, but his looks have changed. Maybe the bullying will stop.

As for the team, we have reconnected with other people, other cultures, and why we went into the health care field. We looked out for our patients, and we looked out for fellow team members. There was always an offer of help from someone near by.

If you hear of a medical mission trip or a volunteer opportunity that interests you, take the extra moment and check it out. Your life might be changed forever! This team will go again next year. We need OR nurses, Recovery Room nurses, translators, assistant surgeons, and surgeons. This year, the specialties covered were plastics, gynecology, urology, and general. There is always a need for an assistant surgeon with other skills.

Come join us.

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A Growing Number of Surgeries

Susan Dean, RN, is a nurse manager at Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Medical Center.  She’s currently in Antigua, Guatemala, as part of a medical team with Faith In Practice, a nonprofit organization that provides continuity of medical care to the poorest of Guatemala. This is Susan’s seventh consecutive year serving on a Faith In Practice surgical mission.

The days and numbers of procedures continue to grow.  We find that there are more people that need surgeries, which we hope to fulfill.

Some of the happiest patients are a group of four men that all had urological surgeries.  They are all recovering on the same floor and enjoy joking about their foley bags.  They call them

Gordon Haddow, MD, works with a patient in the local hospital.

Gordon Haddow, MD, works with a patient in the local hospital.

their purses, although one called it his suitcase while holding a urine-filled foley bag.

Another patient, Mariana, had a hysterectomy. She reported before surgery that she didn’t care what had to be done or removed. She just wanted to be able to go gather firewood without her insides falling out.

The world down here is very different.  As we check patients in we find that many of them are not able to read or write. In order to get their consent, they’re using their thumb prints as opposed to a signature.

The team performs surgery on an infant with a cleft palette.

The team performs surgery on an infant with a cleft palette.

Also, many patients that we treat are coming from villages that are hours and hours away, so the doctors take this into consideration when deciding on post-op and discharge orders.  Most of these patients will stay in the hospital longer simply because they cannot make the long journey back to their homes. And, in the case of a complication, it would be difficult for them to return to the Obras–or hospital.

The lives of many children are being changed dramatically by surgeries to help their appearance after many previous cleft lip and palate surgeries.  Their parents come to their bedside after surgery and just break down with emotion.  Most of them reported that their kids were being bullied at school because of their appearance.

The mom of Jocelyn, a 14-year old female in for rhinoplasty, while in tears of joy reported that this surgery is just in time for her Quinceanera.